Oral histories help us understand the way that the world was in generations prior to ours. Oral history refers to living people’s testimonies about their own experiences. In some cases, oral histories allow humans to remember the world hundreds of generations back — before written, photographed, or otherwise physically documented histories. Additionally, oral histories can come from anyone — you don’t have to be a historian to remember your own experiences. This means we can get more diverse and unique versions of the past.

https://www.risingstars-uk.com/blog/february-2018/oral-history-blog

In this assignment, students were asked to seek out an oral history that could tell them about the world before their lifetime. The following blogs contain the gifted stories received by our students. Enjoy!!!

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Following our first module, where students learned about some of the principles of evolution, they were tasked with picking an evolutionary concept or theme and creating a graphic illustration to explain how it works, with examples. Below are some of the top infographics from our class.

By Dana Smits

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In this course, students are learning to use the tools of evolutionary anthropology to trace human origins and adaptations through deep time. The goal will be to explore how evidence from the past (fossils, remnants of tools and art, DNA) as well as parallels in the present helps us to define what it means to be human and understand the unique moments of adaptation and change that created, and continues to maintain, our species.

We are a HUGE CLASS!! (132!) but we hope that through this publication, you can learn alongside us and get the perspective of a few student voices.

This publication is meant to center a selection of assignments from students, and highlight some of the main themes covered in the class.

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Keitlyn Alcantara

Keitlyn Alcantara

Anthropological bioarchaeologist, writer, and believer in food as the solution to everything.